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Can intelligent use of data improve quality of social care provision?

With adult social care under continuous pressure, lack of budgets and a rising number of people needing support; the industry faces a myriad of challenges to ensure that such pressures do not lead to poorer quality services.

The potential that data analytics and technology can bring to raising the quality of social care provision is enormous. By collecting and analysing data more intelligently and creatively, councils and providers can pinpoint issues and problems in service provision earlier, which protects vulnerable people and develops a more robust care market. Effective use of data helps to benchmark quality, identify potential problems and give new insight into service delivery.

With such severe market pressures, collecting and analysing real-time data on service delivery can be a key factor in maintaining quality of care.

CM2000 has seen a significant growth in the use of its business intelligence tool, CMBI, to help extract actionable data quickly and understand the stories behind the figures.

Analysing information on staff turnover, complaints or missed calls can give early warning of potential problems. The wealth of performance information available facilitates contract management and benchmarking.

It’s not just this helicopter view of service data that can help measure quality. Plotting Service User journeys (including service stops) helps identify patterns of care delivery and changing requirements.

Data intelligence was one of the many topics covered at the ADASS (Association of Directors of Adult Social Services) and CM2000 roundtable discussion on: ‘THE DATA DIMENSION - Making intelligent use of data to support sustainable and quality social care’, at the Spring Seminar in Staffordshire.

CM2000 sponsored the event and took part in the industry debate. Lots of interesting and thought-provoking themes were discussed by eight social care leaders, chaired by Mrs Margaret Willcox, the Director of Adult Social Care at Gloucestershire County Council and immediate past president of ADASS. The output from the debate was written up into a short report. To request a copy click here.
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